Tag Archives: camping

Osprey Packs Argon 85 Backpack

Sized to accommodate a week's worth of backpacking or mountaineering gear, the Osprey Argon 85 backpack features an ergonomically enhanced suspension and hipbelt design specifically made for men. While most hiking, backpacking and climbing packs are all about stowing gear, Osprey's Argon 85 combines those storage options with a supportive AirScape backpanel, BioForm A/X features and a ReCurve Suspension for an exceptional fit. The Osprey Argon 85 also has an AquaSource ReCurve hydration pouch that connects either to the backpack's internal backpanel or on top of contents inside the pack. Like other Argon series backpacks, the Argon 85 has a removable top pocket that doubles as a lumbar pack for short excursions around your backcountry campsite. Lycra/nylon blended stretch panels along the front and side pockets easily expand to accommodate additional camping and outdoor gear without straining zippers and straps.

Price: $398.95

Low-Impact Hiking and Camping

Cooking

Carry in, carry out. Before you hit the trail, repackage food into reusable containers. When empty, the containers can hold waste until you can dispose of it properly. Pack everything that you carry into the backcountry back out with you.

  1. In bear country, protect wildlife, your food supply and yourself by storing rations securely. Seek advice from park rangers on proper food storage.
  2. Some parks install bear-resistant containers or poles (for hanging “bear-bagged” food) in backcountry sites. Pick up and clean up spilled foods.
  3. Use a backpacking stove to prepare meals. It takes less time and has less impact on the environment than building a campfire. In addition, many areas prohibit the use of campfires except in designated areas.
Fires

Where fires are permitted, use established fire rings or fire pans. Do not scorch large rocks or overhangs.

  1. Keep your fire small. Gather sticks no larger than an adult wrist. Leave branches on trees, even if they are downed or dead.
  2. Put out campfires completely. In the morning, remove all unburned trash from the fire ring and scatter the cold ashes over a large area well away from camp.
Hiking

Visit the backcountry in small groups and try to avoid popular areas during peak-use periods.

  1. Stay on designated trails and walk in single file in the center of the path to avoid trampling trailside plants.
  2. Many grasses and sub-alpine plants are extremely sensitive to foot traffic. If you must venture beyond the trail, choose the most durable surfaces to walk on (rock, gravel or snow).
Campsites

Choose an established, legal site. If you are wilderness camping, pick a previously used campsite when available to decrease impact on terrain.

  1. Good campsites are found, not made. Don’t alter a site for your own purposes by clearing vegetation, building structures or digging trenches.
Sanitation

Set up camp in areas where vegetation is compacted or absent. Camp at least 200 feet (about 70 adult steps) from lakes and streams to help keep pollutants out of water sources.

  1. For bathing or dishwashing, haul water 200 feet from streams or lakes and use small amounts of biodegradable soap. A small bowl of water and one baby wipe provide a thorough bath. Strain your dishwater and scatter it or bury it in a hole so it won’t attract insects. Use gravel or sand to clean pots and pans.
  2. Deposit human waste in a hole, six-to-eight inches deep, at least 200 feet from water, trails and your campsite. Use toilet paper sparingly. Pack it out in fragile areas or where required.
  3. Check your campsite to make sure you have removed all refuse and other evidence of your stay. Make sure you scan the tent area for small items that could inadvertently be left behind.
Keeping the “wild” in wilderness

Leave plants, rocks and historical artifacts for others to enjoy.

  1. Domestic animals and wild country often don’t mix. Most state and national parks prohibit dogs or require them to be on leashes. If you must take your dog with you, make sure it is under control at all times. Do not allow it to chase other animals or become a problem for other hikers or campers.

Enjoy your adventure in the backcountry. Take only pictures. Leave only footprints.

Sorel Mens Conquest Snow Boot

Whether it's the comfort or the longevity, guys wear rugged Sorel snow and mud boots like they dote on their decades-old pick-up trucks. This unusual sentimentality evolved from Sorel's reputation for creating tough, waterproof boots with classic styling that sidesteps the trendy trappings offered by other footwear manufacturers. The Sorel Men's Conquest Snow Boot features a durable seam-sealed construction using a combination of tough full grain leather and flexible synthetic textile. Sorel uses a proven molded waterproof shell made from thermal rubber to effectively lock out water and snow. The Conquest Snow Boot comfortably wraps your feet in dependable weather protection that's perfect for working in winter conditions, camping in the high alpine or navigating the slushy day lodge parking lot at your favorite family ski resort. Other guys might brag about their snow or utility boots lasting for years, but many Sorel boot owners already know that aside from replacing frayed laces, durable designs like this Conquest Snow Boot will keep their feet warm and dry for a decade or even two.

Price: $134.95

First Aid

The farther from the beaten path you venture, the more prepared you should be for a medical emergency. Always carry a first-aid kit designed for the type of trek and the number of people in your group.

A variety of first-aid kits are available for day hikes, family camping trips or backpacking treks. Kits should be tailored to your trekking terrain, weather, the ages of hikers and your group’s special medical needs.

It is important to know how to use everything in your first-aid kit beforehand. You won’t have time in the middle of an emergency to read an instruction manual.

Before you go, learn about any possible hazards at your destination, such as poisonous plants, snakes and insects. Ask local officials or park rangers if you need any special gear or clothing. Locate the road and public phone closest to your campsite or trail, so you know where to summon help if it is needed.

Some organizations offer wilderness first-aid courses targeted to outdoors enthusiasts. Be sure to practice what you learn and share it with others in your party.

Good first-aid kits are available in a wide range of prices and specialty kits are available for mountain bikers, canoeists and others.

The following items should be considered when outfitting a basic first-aid kit:

  • 1 elastic-roll bandage
  • Aspirin or ibuprofen
  • Adhesive tape
  • Alcohol swabs
  • Antacid
  • Antihistamine
  • Antiseptic ointment
  • Adhesive bandages, assorted sizes
  • Bulb irrigating syringe
  • Butterfly bandages
  • Chemical heat and cold packs
  • Dry-wash pads or wipes
  • Diarrhea medicine
  • Gauze pads
  • Hydrocortisone cream (soothes allergic skin)
  • Insect repellent
  • Mirror, small and unbreakable
  • Moleskin, 1 or 2 packets
  • Cotton swab, sterile, packaged in pairs
  • Safety pins
  • Scissors (Swiss Army Pen Knife has scissors, small blade and nail file)
  • Sunscreen
  • Triangular bandage
  • Tweezers

Inspect the contents before every trip and make sure the tools are clean and supplies in good condition. Replace expired medicines and add items you wish you had brought on the last trip. Make sure the container is durable and waterproof, and stow it in an accessible compartment of your backpack.

Kelty Cache Hauler External Frame (Sold Alone)

With a large sturdy aluminum frame and plush suspension straps youll be able to get large amounts of gear in and out or your camp easily and comfortable with the Kelty Cache Hauler External Frame. Multiple lash points and a hinged fold down base let you strap down your load for a stable ride and with a stabilizing waist belt and sternum strap youll feel secure toting your cargo long distances. A moisture wicking backpanel improves air circulation and allows sweat to evaporate to keep you cool as you lug heavy weights over uneven terrain and with a padded hydration sleeve youll stay well watered as you exert yourself. On its own or paired with the Kelty Cache Packbag this lightweight tough external frame is perfect for hunting, camping or any trip that takes you deep into the field.

Price: $119.95