Tag Archives: backpack

Helly Hansen HH Backpack

Grab this durable Helly Hansen HH Backpack and watch it stand the test of your rugged lifestyle. Made of 100% nylon tarpaulin for maximum abrasion resistance, this backpack can take whatever you throw at it and in it. With a roomy main compartment, separate external laptop pocket and two external key and organizer pockets, you can stuff it full and keep track of your life with ease.

Price: $74.95

eno DayTripper Deluxe Backpack

Who says that you can't carry it all with you? Whether you're bound for the backcountry or just trotting to the park, the DayTripper Deluxe Backpack from Eagles Nest Outfitters features the carrying capacity and comfort components you require to haul a range of gear, such as books, SIGG water bottles or perhaps a Columbia jacket. The well-designed backpanel and shoulder straps have anatomically-sound shaping for excellent support and enhanced comfort. Up top on the DayTripper Deluxe you'll discover a large opening for quick access to backpack items.

Price: $52.95

Mammut Heron Light 65 Backpack

Slimmed down from its big brother but with the same compliments, the Mammut Heron Light 65 Backpack boasts light and fast ventilated load control and range of motion for all your on / off the trail muscle-powered adventures. Featuring 2-layer, high-density EVA padding on the back panel, hipbelt and shoulder straps, this backpack provides breathable comfort and minimal contact points to ensure exceptional ventilation. Its pivoting hipbelt offers excellent load control and balance, even when scrambling or bushwhacking and the hipbelt angle adjusts for a customized fit. The Heron Light 65's 4-level back also adjusts to allow for an individualized fit of your torso length. Its flexible, anatomically-shaped 7mm aluminum V-frame offers superior range of motion and direct load transfer to the hipbelt. Carrying conveniences include a height-adjustable top lid that features internal and external zippered pockets, hydration-system compatibility that allows for hands-free drinking on the go, and separate zippered compartment at the bottom to accommodate a sleeping bag. For grabbing essentials on the fly a large stretch pocket on the front of the pack body is perfect for a rain jacket or other oft-accessed gear, 2 side stretch pockets and stowable bottle holder for carrying water bottles or other small items, and a small hipbelt pocket that is ideal for snacks. Ice axe loops and trekking pole straps let you lash tools to the exterior of the pack, while compression straps snug the load at the sides or front of the pack. This Mammut backpack allows you to go high – go light with everything you need at your finger tips.

Price: $215.99

First Aid

The farther from the beaten path you venture, the more prepared you should be for a medical emergency. Always carry a first-aid kit designed for the type of trek and the number of people in your group.

A variety of first-aid kits are available for day hikes, family camping trips or backpacking treks. Kits should be tailored to your trekking terrain, weather, the ages of hikers and your group’s special medical needs.

It is important to know how to use everything in your first-aid kit beforehand. You won’t have time in the middle of an emergency to read an instruction manual.

Before you go, learn about any possible hazards at your destination, such as poisonous plants, snakes and insects. Ask local officials or park rangers if you need any special gear or clothing. Locate the road and public phone closest to your campsite or trail, so you know where to summon help if it is needed.

Some organizations offer wilderness first-aid courses targeted to outdoors enthusiasts. Be sure to practice what you learn and share it with others in your party.

Good first-aid kits are available in a wide range of prices and specialty kits are available for mountain bikers, canoeists and others.

The following items should be considered when outfitting a basic first-aid kit:

  • 1 elastic-roll bandage
  • Aspirin or ibuprofen
  • Adhesive tape
  • Alcohol swabs
  • Antacid
  • Antihistamine
  • Antiseptic ointment
  • Adhesive bandages, assorted sizes
  • Bulb irrigating syringe
  • Butterfly bandages
  • Chemical heat and cold packs
  • Dry-wash pads or wipes
  • Diarrhea medicine
  • Gauze pads
  • Hydrocortisone cream (soothes allergic skin)
  • Insect repellent
  • Mirror, small and unbreakable
  • Moleskin, 1 or 2 packets
  • Cotton swab, sterile, packaged in pairs
  • Safety pins
  • Scissors (Swiss Army Pen Knife has scissors, small blade and nail file)
  • Sunscreen
  • Triangular bandage
  • Tweezers

Inspect the contents before every trip and make sure the tools are clean and supplies in good condition. Replace expired medicines and add items you wish you had brought on the last trip. Make sure the container is durable and waterproof, and stow it in an accessible compartment of your backpack.