Tag Archives: 200

Patagonia Yerba Pack

With a single compartment that accommodates reading materials, lunch, and jacket, the Patagonia Yerba Pack daypack carries your essentials from the bus to the trail. The backpacks padded sleeve is raised to help protect up to a 17-inch laptop from drops. A zippered microfleece-lined top pocket holds an audio device or sunglasses, a stash sleeve stuffs a shell, and dual stretch-woven pockets carry water bottles. Shoulder straps are made with airflow mesh to keep you cooler in the heat. For day hikes, leave the laptop at home and slip a hydration reservoir in the computer sleeve, which comes with a tube port. A lanyard secures your keys and an internal organizer holds pens and other small items. Made from tough but supple 420-denier 100% nylon oxford plain weave with 840-denier 100% ballistics nylon reinforcements. The lining is 200-denier 100% polyester. All fabrics have a Deluge DWR (durable water repellent) finish.

Price: $69

Patagonia Fuego Pack

Whether you're a full-time student or rambling the mountains on a challenging weather day, the Patagonia Fuego Pack carries your life essentials load. This backpacks main compartment holds the bulk of gear, and features a padded sleeve that protects up to a 17-inch laptop. The sleeve has a tube port and accepts a hydration reservoir when you hit the trail. A second compartment holds daily supplies – keys, paperback, pens and phone. A zippered exterior pocket provides easy access to a wallet, an exterior stuff pocket stashes a shell, a pair of stretch pockets hold water bottles, and a microfleece-lined pocket protects sunglasses or an audio device. To carry it all comfortably, the Fuego uses heat-venting airflow mesh for the shoulder straps and back panel. It has a webbing waistbelt, adjustable sternum strap with an emergency whistle, and compression straps to stabilize the load. Made from 420-denier 100% nylon oxford plain weave with an 840-denier 100% ballistics nylon bottom. The lining is 200-denier 100% polyester. All fabrics have a Deluge DWR (durable water repellent) finish.

Price: $89

Low-Impact Hiking and Camping

Cooking

Carry in, carry out. Before you hit the trail, repackage food into reusable containers. When empty, the containers can hold waste until you can dispose of it properly. Pack everything that you carry into the backcountry back out with you.

  1. In bear country, protect wildlife, your food supply and yourself by storing rations securely. Seek advice from park rangers on proper food storage.
  2. Some parks install bear-resistant containers or poles (for hanging “bear-bagged” food) in backcountry sites. Pick up and clean up spilled foods.
  3. Use a backpacking stove to prepare meals. It takes less time and has less impact on the environment than building a campfire. In addition, many areas prohibit the use of campfires except in designated areas.
Fires

Where fires are permitted, use established fire rings or fire pans. Do not scorch large rocks or overhangs.

  1. Keep your fire small. Gather sticks no larger than an adult wrist. Leave branches on trees, even if they are downed or dead.
  2. Put out campfires completely. In the morning, remove all unburned trash from the fire ring and scatter the cold ashes over a large area well away from camp.
Hiking

Visit the backcountry in small groups and try to avoid popular areas during peak-use periods.

  1. Stay on designated trails and walk in single file in the center of the path to avoid trampling trailside plants.
  2. Many grasses and sub-alpine plants are extremely sensitive to foot traffic. If you must venture beyond the trail, choose the most durable surfaces to walk on (rock, gravel or snow).
Campsites

Choose an established, legal site. If you are wilderness camping, pick a previously used campsite when available to decrease impact on terrain.

  1. Good campsites are found, not made. Don’t alter a site for your own purposes by clearing vegetation, building structures or digging trenches.
Sanitation

Set up camp in areas where vegetation is compacted or absent. Camp at least 200 feet (about 70 adult steps) from lakes and streams to help keep pollutants out of water sources.

  1. For bathing or dishwashing, haul water 200 feet from streams or lakes and use small amounts of biodegradable soap. A small bowl of water and one baby wipe provide a thorough bath. Strain your dishwater and scatter it or bury it in a hole so it won’t attract insects. Use gravel or sand to clean pots and pans.
  2. Deposit human waste in a hole, six-to-eight inches deep, at least 200 feet from water, trails and your campsite. Use toilet paper sparingly. Pack it out in fragile areas or where required.
  3. Check your campsite to make sure you have removed all refuse and other evidence of your stay. Make sure you scan the tent area for small items that could inadvertently be left behind.
Keeping the “wild” in wilderness

Leave plants, rocks and historical artifacts for others to enjoy.

  1. Domestic animals and wild country often don’t mix. Most state and national parks prohibit dogs or require them to be on leashes. If you must take your dog with you, make sure it is under control at all times. Do not allow it to chase other animals or become a problem for other hikers or campers.

Enjoy your adventure in the backcountry. Take only pictures. Leave only footprints.

Patagonia Violeta 25L Backpack

The sleek, single-compartment Patagonia Violeta 25L Backpack is designed to fit a woman slipping through the daily flux. The main compartment holds lunch, papers, books and a sweater; it has stash pockets inside for caching items and a padded laptop sleeve that cradles a 15-inch or smaller laptop off the ground. Slip a hydration reservoir (not included) into the computer sleeve and route the tube through a built-in port when you're off for a day hike. A zippered microfleece-lined top pocket holds your audio device or sunglasses, and the exterior stash pocket keeps other items handy. An internal organizer contains the small stuff, a lanyard secures your keys, and dual stretch-woven pockets carry water bottles. Airflow mesh shoulder straps with ergonomic shaping make carrying more comfortable in warm weather. Made from a tough yet supple 420-denier nylon oxford plain weave with 840-denier ballistics nylon reinforcements. The lining is 200-denier polyester. All fabrics have a Deluge DWR (durable water repellent) finish.

Price: $69

Wolverine Mens Durashocks Soft-Toe Waterproof Insulated 6 inch Work Boots

Comfortable boots that can be worn on a variety of terrain, the Men's Wolverine Durashocks Soft-Toe Waterproof Insulated Work Boots (6 in.) keep your feet warm and dry whether you're working in the yard or running errands around town. The tough Cambrelle lining absorbs moisture to keep feet dry and comfortable, and the 200-gram Thinsulate Insulation provides ample warmth. Nothing compares to the quality of Wolverine boots, get the Wolverine Men's Durashocks Soft-Toe Waterproof Insulated Work Boots (6 in.) and go without boundaries.

Price: $133.45